Folksonomies – Power To The Folk

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Some of the topics covered: a story of folksonomies, their properties, the differences with traditional classification schemes and facets, folksonomies in the enterprise. This paper is meant to be an overview of the mass of posts written in the last months. Nothing is new. I’ve only added a structure and a systematic organization to a […]


Some of the topics covered: a story of folksonomies, their properties, the differences with traditional classification schemes and facets, folksonomies in the enterprise.

This paper is meant to be an overview of the mass of posts written in the last months. Nothing is new. I’ve only added a structure and a systematic organization to a selection of the published material.

Table of contents

  • Introduction
  • Overview of classification schemes
  • New information sources and mass amateurization of Web publishing
  • Limits of taxonomies
  • Folksonomies: an emerging approach to distributed classification
  • Folksonomies at work
  • Broad and narrow folksonomies
  • Properties of folksonomies
  • Enterprise folksonomies
  • Side benefits of folksonomies
  • From trees to leaves: a comparison of taxonomies, facets and folksonomies
  • Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • Bibliography
  • Further readings

Introduction

In recent times, an unprecedented amount of Web content is being generated through web logs, wikis and other social tools thanks to lower technology and cost barriers. A new host of content creators is emerging, often individuals with the will to participate in discussions and share their ideas with like-minded people. This is equal to say that this increasing amount of varied, valuable content is generated by non-trained, non-expert information professionals: they are at the same time users and producers of information.

We have gone past a critical mass of connectivity between people that has introduced a new revolutionary ability to communicate, collaborate and share goods online.

To respond to these increased informational and exchange needs, new communication models are emerging and producing an incredible amount of distributed information that information management professionals, information architects, librarians and knowledge workers at large need to link, aggregate, organize in order to extract knowledge.

The issue is whether the traditional organizational schemes used so far are suitable to address the classification needs of fast-proliferating, new information sources or if, to achieve this goal, better aggregation and concept matching tools are required.

Folksonomies attempt to provide a solution to this issue, by introducing an innovative distributed approach based on social classification.

The complete paper Folksonomies: power to the people

22.06.2005